Saturday 4th, December 2021
canara news

Drinking is deadly for Hepatitis C patients

Published On : 15 May 2016


New York, May 15 (IANS) Drinking alcohol can increase the risk of liver damage and death from the Hepatitis C virus, a study has found, adding that several people living with Hepatitis C are either former or current excessive alcohol drinkers.

Alcohol use is especially detrimental to patients with Hepatitis C.

The findings showed that people infected with Hepatitis C are three times more likely to drink five or more drinks per day everyday than those without Hepatitis C, lifetime abstainers or current non-excessive drinkers.

"Alcohol promotes faster development of fibrosis and progression to cirrhosis in people living with Hepatitis C, making drinking a dangerous and often deadly activity," said lead author Amber L. Taylor from the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Viral Hepatitis.

"In 2010, alcohol-related liver disease ranked third as a cause of death among people with Hepatitis C," Tylor added in the paper published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

In order to better understand the link between alcohol use and Hepatitis C, investigators examined self-reported alcohol use.

The team looked at Hepatitis C infection rates for four groups: lifetime abstainers, former drinkers, non-excessive current drinkers and excessive current drinkers.

People who participated and tested positive for Hepatitis C antibodies found that 50 percent were unaware before being notified.

"Half of all people living with Hepatitis C are not aware of their infection nor the serious medical risks they face when consuming alcohol," Taylor stated.

The new information provided by this study helps shed more light on the level of alcohol consumption among those living with Hepatitis C.

It can help guide best practices for both treating patients and steering possible interventions.

"Targeted strategies should emphasise testing to increase Hepatitis C awareness among undiagnosed people, prevent disease progression, and ultimately link those infected to curative life-saving treatments," Taylor noted.







More News

Mother-daughter conflict ups suicide risk in abused teen girls: Study
Mother-daughter conflict ups suicide risk in abused teen girls: Study
Novel wearable ultrasound patch monitors BP inside body
Novel wearable ultrasound patch monitors BP inside body
Mental health may not ruin teenagers' friendships: Study
Mental health may not ruin teenagers' friendships: Study

Write your Comments

Disclaimer: Please write your correct name and email address. Kindly do not post any personal, abusive, defamatory, infringing, obscene, indecent, discriminatory or unlawful or similar comments. canaranews.com will not be responsible for any defamatory message posted under this article.

Please note that under 66A of the IT Act, sending offensive or menacing messages through electronic communication service and sending false messages to cheat, mislead or deceive people or to cause annoyance to them is punishable. It is obligatory on CANARANEWS to provide the IP address and other details of senders of such comments, to the authority concerned upon request.

Hence, sending offensive comments using canaranews will be purely at your own risk, and in no way will canaranews.com be held responsible.